Trump impeachment lawyer speaks out: 'I'm not worried what other people think'

Sen. Rand Paul: Trump impeachment trial 'dead on arrival' in Senate

Kentucky Republican joins 'Fox News Primetime' to discuss his objection to the 'unconstitutional' Trump impeachment.

The Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump is set to take place in February, and his defense will not be handled by a major law firm or oft-cited professor, but by a South Carolina solo practitioner.

For Karl "Butch" Bowers, there was no question that he would take the case when Trump called.

SEN. PATRICK LEAHY, SET TO PRESIDE OVER IMPEACHMENT TRIAL, RELEASED FROM HOSPITAL AFTER HEALTH SCARE

"It's who I am. It's what I do. It's all about the rule of law in the Constitution," Bowers told the Washington Post.

Despite the heated political climate surrounding the trial and the allegations of inciting insurrection, Bowers remains undaunted and unconcerned about what his involvement could do to his reputation.

"I’m not worried what other people think," he told the Post, adding that he has not been following media coverage of his role in the trial.

Bowers did not immediately respond to Fox News' questions about the case.

RAND PAUL CALLS TRUMP IMPEACHMENT TRIAL 'DEAD ON ARRIVAL' AFTER 45 GOP SENATORS VOTE AGAINST IT

His decision to defend Trump came as no shock to South Carolina political consultant Tim Pearson.

"It doesn’t surprise me he is willing to do the work," Pearson told the Post. "He is a lawyer’s lawyer in the sense that I think he believes that everybody deserves representation."

Bowers, who refused to say whether he voted for Trump in 2020, is no stranger to representing top government officials. He previously served as counsel for then-South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford in 2009 when Sanford faced possible impeachment over allegations involving state funds and an affair with a woman from Argentina.

Three years later, Bowers represented then-Gov. Nikki Haley before the State Ethics Commission when she faced campaign finance-related allegations.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Bowers was inspired to enter this line of work after his father, who led the Federal Highway Administration in the Carter administration, was convicted in 1980 after being charged with conspiracy and embezzlement. Bowers believed his father was specifically targeted by prosecutors, possibly due to his own political aspirations.

"This goes back to my dad," Bowers told the Post. "I’m not looking to get anybody to say good things about me. What I’m looking for is to help the people I’m retained to represent. And that’s what I care about."

Ronn Blitzer Fox News